What are suicidal feelings?

Suicide is the act of intentionally taking your own life.

Suicidal feelings can range from being preoccupied by abstract thoughts about ending your life, or feeling that people would be better off without you, to thinking about methods of suicide, or making clear plans to take your own life

If you are feeling suicidal, you might be scared or confused by these feelings.

But you are not alone. Many people think about suicide at some point in their lifetime.

How long will I feel suicidal?

Suicidal feelings can be overwhelming. How long these feelings last differs for everyone. It is common to feel as if you’ll never be happy or hopeful again. But with support and self-help, the majority of people who have felt suicidal go on to live fulfilling lives. The earlier you let someone know how you’re feeling, the quicker you’ll be able to get support to overcome these feelings.

However, it can feel difficult to open up to people.

You may want others to understand what you’re going through, but you might feel:

– unable to tell someone.
– unsure of who to tell.
– concerned that they won’t understand.
– fearful of being judged.
– worried you’ll upset them.

If this is the case, you might find it helpful to show our pages on supporting someone else with suicidal feelings to someone you trust. This can be a good way of starting the conversation and can give them suggestions of how they can help you.

Download the Mind brochure on what to do if you are experiencing suicidal thoughts.

What is depression?

Depression is a low mood that lasts for a long time, and affects your everyday life.

In its mildest form, depression can mean just being in low spirits. It doesn’t stop you leading your normal life but makes everything harder to do and seem less worthwhile. At its most severe, depression can be life-threatening because it can make you feel suicidal or simply give up the will to live.

There are also some specific types of depression:

– Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) – depression that usually (but not always) occurs in the winter. SAD Association provides information and advice. See our page on SAD for more information.

– Dysthymia – continuous mild depression that lasts for two years or more. Also called persistent depressive disorder or chronic depression.

– Prenatal depression – sometimes also called antenatal depression, it occurs during pregnancy.

– Postnatal depression (PND) – occurs in the weeks and months after becoming a parent. Postnatal depression is usually diagnosed in women but it can affect men, too.

Download the Mind brochure on how to cope with depression.

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Talk to someone

If you’re experiencing a mental health crisis you can get help by;

  • Contacting your GP or Care Co-ordinator
  • Telephone the Access Team on 01724 382015

In an emergency you can call 999 or go to Accident and Emergency.

You can get non-emergency advice from the NHS by calling 111 and support is available from Samaritans by calling 116 123.

121 and meetings are available at our centre. Please call 01724 279 500 to arrange centre support. We are here to help.

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