What is depression?

Depression is a low mood that lasts for a long time, and affects your everyday life.

In its mildest form, depression can mean just being in low spirits. It doesn’t stop you leading your normal life but makes everything harder to do and seem less worthwhile. At its most severe, depression can be life-threatening because it can make you feel suicidal or simply give up the will to live.

There are also some specific types of depression:

– Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) – depression that usually (but not always) occurs in the winter. SAD Association provides information and advice. See our page on SAD for more information.

– Dysthymia – continuous mild depression that lasts for two years or more. Also called persistent depressive disorder or chronic depression.

– Prenatal depression – sometimes also called antenatal depression, it occurs during pregnancy.

– Postnatal depression (PND) – occurs in the weeks and months after becoming a parent. Postnatal depression is usually diagnosed in women but it can affect men, too.

Download the Mind brochure on how to cope with depression.

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Talk to someone

If you’re experiencing a mental health crisis you can get help by;

  • Contacting your GP or Care Co-ordinator
  • Telephone the Access Team on 01724 382015

In an emergency you can call 999 or go to Accident and Emergency.

You can get non-emergency advice from the NHS by calling 111 and support is available from Samaritans by calling 116 123.

121 and meetings are available at our centre. Please call 01724 279 500 to arrange centre support. We are here to help.

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